Blog changes

Thanks to everyone who followed Training Because I Can! over the last nine years. This blog started with Addison's Disease, hypothyroidism and a crazy idea of doing an Ironman distance triathlon. My life has changed and so has this blog. I am using this blog strictly for Addison's Support topics from here on out. I hope to continue providing people with hints for living life well with adrenal insufficiency.

Friday, November 30, 2012

Rant: Run before you walk? Impossible!

I am not sure if this is just human nature or if we are a very entitled society.  Why would anyone want to run before they walk.   It's exhausting to see people constantly undermining themselves by wanting to run full throttle at the very beginning of an exercise program.  In the end, people who want to run before they walk get sicker or injured and then complain, complain, complain!!!!!!

Tell me why people think they can be couch bound for a year and then think they should get up and run five miles?  Why?  What can they expect to gain?  What's so great about going far and fast and running the whole way?  I really want to know.  It's not a very good idea and NEVER has positive benefits.


WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU RUN BEFORE YOU WALK
  • You have an under trained body that's not used to the old, physical stresses.   Muscles, bones and tendons are weak.  The endocrine system is not used to being pushed.  You are probably fat which makes the above problems worse.
  • You set your mind to the glory of doing what you "used to do a decade ago".  Woohooo for you, you ran a 10k ten years ago.  Since then you've been ill, put on 20 pounds and had a kid or two.
  • You are ready, you go out and RUN.  It feels great at first.  You start to feel ill but push through to five miles.  You drag your sorry ass home.
  • You are unable to get off the couch for two days because you are so sore.  You complain that running is not fun.
  • Perhaps you persist in this regime for two weeks?
  • You end up with a stress fracture in your foot and a pulled hamstring.
  • You determine exercise didn't work for you.  You complain more.

REALITY
  • Too much, too far, too fast will ONLY get you hurt.  Look at David Goggins.  Even excellent athletes that do too much, too far, too fast will get hurt.
  • You will get depressed that your exercise "didn't work".
  • You will whine and complain that you get hurt from exercising.
  • Even if you are determined to exercise again, you will have to take a break so that you can heal and whine about that too.
  • Most likely you will go back to your couch life and affair with Pop-Tarts and the TV and get fatter.
  • YOU HAVE GONE ABOUT GETTING EXERCISE ALL WRONG.

A WAY TO ACHIEVE YOUR GOALS
  • Consult your doctor to see i f you are healthy enough to exercise.
    • If your doctor says no, pin him/her down as to what WOULD make you healthy enough to exercise. Set health goals and reach them.  Go back and get the go ahead.
    • If your doctor says no and you don't agree, find a new doctor who will support your goals.
  • Hire a trainer who knows his ass from his elbow and can help you come up with a consistent, slow build program.  If you want someone who is currently uncertified but has half a brain, contact me, I can help you build a reasonable strength training and walking program and set goals for a fee.
  • START OUT BY HAVING A GOOD WALKING ROUTINE.  WALKING IS GOOD, WALKING CAN BE HARD, WALKING STRENGTHENS BONES AND MUSCLES.  WALKING WILL BURN CALORIES.  (Why do people think walking is so uncool?  I don't get it.) IF YOU ARE GOOD AT WALKING, YOU CAN WALK FASTER AND FARTHER THAN PEOPLE RUN, THINK ABOUT IT.  READ THIS IF YOU WANT TO THINK WALKING IS COOL OR EVEN IF YOU DON'T.  This guy can kick your ass and he's in his mid 60s.
    Ultra Walking With The Master – Ulli Kamm

  • Set long term goals, medium term goals and short term goals and don't be married to them.
  • Be consistent.
  • Be proud of your accomplishments no matter how large or small.
  • Be more consistent. Be consistent, be consistent.
  • Keep a detailed journal of your medications, exercise and how you feel.  You will see patterns on paper.  You will make up patterns if you try to remember things.
  • Be more consistent. Be consistent, be consistent.
  • Adjust medications as you progress or as needed.
  • Know that you can achieve any goals you set.
  • Be more consistent. Be consistent, be consistent.
                • BE INSPIRED

That's it, rant over.  A rant along the same lines about Adrenal Insufficiency meds will follow...eventually.





Post a Comment